Interweaving Multiple Tones

🗓 14 Mar 2016

Life is filled with humor and sadness. Tragedy and absurdity. Drama and dullness. Everything is a part of everything. So my work reflects that. I think saying that a work should have x tone or be 'dark,' is kind of silly, unless you are going for a specifically genre-defined work. And I think it is just too restricting. I can write whatever I want to how I want it to be. So I have humorous sections and really tragic sections. I'm going to use book two, Harmonic Waves, as a primary example of interweaving multiple tones into a coherent work. How to Stop Wildfire really shows this too, but I feel like talking about Harmonic Waves, because I think it shows the maximum applications of my world's humor and tragedy. I'll try to talk about the scenes generally, and not reveal too much spoilers, but there will be spoilers for...

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The Use of Genre

🗓 07 Jan 2016

I've rambled about genre before. I'm not going to repeat myself and say what genre is or isn't or what not. This is, instead, a vague response to a trend I've noticed. I've seen a lot of posts recently discussing why science fiction and fantasy are important. How they can help society and such. I don't disagree with such things on principle. The use of genre can make a theme resonate more. Genre is a device of its own that must be used well so that your story is expressed the way it ought to be. What genre your story is in affects how the story is told and what is being told. Going back to science fiction, there is one example that show cases its potential for showing the truth of society. That piece of sci-fi is Star Trek. I'll be referring to The Original Series here, but it...

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Being a (Female) Author

🗓 10 Aug 2015

Because for some reason there has to be a distinction. There was this show on the Syfy channel called Warehouse 13. It was a solid family-fun flick about a secret warehouse that contained legendary objects of famous people, things like Ferdinand Magellan’s Astrolabe. It had a way of using the watcher’s knowledge and expectation of history as a base and making a story out of twisting it.

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Genre Expectations

🗓 06 Aug 2015

The expectation that when reading a humor book you are going to laugh. That when reading a women's fiction novel women are going to be portrayed strongly. That a mystery book is going to have a mystery. Genre expectations are basic ideas about a book's premise that you can ascribe to it based solely on knowledge of genre. Not all of these ideas are going to be correct, some of them are most certainly going to be wrong. But we still have them, because each genre has its own 'cliches' and 'tropes' that the novels of the genre typically follow in one way or another. There are trope-killer books, like Game of Thrones. In GRRM's novels, the 'hero' doesn't get magic-plot armor, and the 'good' guys die (a lot.) Or there are books that are basically 100% cliche, of which I cannot name because they are not that memorable.

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The Great Genre Confusion

🗓 13 Apr 2015

So in the process of getting ready to publish How To Stop Wildfire (I'm projecting late April...post the 20th) I have been setting up the Amazon details for it. Things like title, series, edition number, and etc. The one piece of detail that has been hanging me up for a few days has been category, or genre. Being the ignorant book reader that I am, I just assumed I would slap it into Science-Fiction and be done with it. I was wrong. So wrong. When did all of these genres come up? The ones I remember were: Apocalyptic, Time Travel, Urban, Cybernetic, Military, Steampunk, and Paranormal. Just for Sci-fi. I get that some books need these classifications. Broad is bad sometimes. I get that, I really do, but with have a handful of very specific options I feel even more at a loss of what How To Stop Wildfire is....

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